Living Agreements and Peaceful, Non-Violent Direct Action


Since the dawn of time many from all walks of life have come to understand who they are as individuals and how their life actually effects the outer world as a whole. Indigenous peoples have it in their teachings to respect Mother Earth, as she provides all that is needed for us to survive. The only thing we need to do in return is to be thankful for what she provides and take care of her so she can continue on sustaining creation. Now later on in history Western Science has only gone on to prove what the global Indigenous population has been saying from the beginning of creation; everything from the shape of Turtle Island to the equality shared and recognised with LGBTQ2S+ communities as everyone has a gift that they contribute to society.


All aspects of our being is to ensure that Mother Earth is taken care of regardless of who you are or what your path may be in life, in the end the survival of anyone on this planet is to look to the knowledge of our elders and share it with everyone. Chief Arvol Looking Horse of the Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota Nations has sent out a message to ask all to understand an Indigenous perspective on what has happened on Turtle Island, and whose words seek to unite the global community through a message from our sacred ceremonies to unite spiritually, each in our own way.


"A “disease of the mind” has affected world leaders and many members of our global community, with a belief that a solution of retaliation and destruction of peoples will bring peace.


In our prophecies, it is told that we are now at the crossroads: either we unite spiritually as a global nation, or we will be faced with chaos, disasters, diseases, and tears from our relatives’ eyes.


We are the only species that is destroying the source of life, meaning Mother Earth, in the name of power, mineral resources, and ownership of land. Using chemicals and methods of warfare that are doing irreversible damage, as Mother Earth is becoming tired and cannot sustain any more impacts of war.


I ask you to join me on this endeavour. Our vision is for the peoples of all continents, regardless of their beliefs in the Creator, to come together as one at their Sacred Sites to pray and meditate and commune with one another, thus promoting an energy shift to heal our Mother Earth and achieve a universal consciousness toward attaining Peace.

That the Government must tell the truth about how deadly our situation is, it must reverse all policies not in alignment with that position and must work alongside the media to communicate the urgency for change including what individuals, communities and businesses need to do." ~Chief Arvol Looking Horse


Chief Arvol Looking Horse

Within this post I have included all 94 calls to action which is essentially a checklist for the Canadian Government to begin restoring a form of relationship with the Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island. This is the way we should be referenced to rather than Canada's Indigenous Peoples because we do not belong to anyone and that is a misconception that keeps being played out in mainstream media to retain the image of a parent state, an ideology that needs to be immediately dismissed in order for relationships to be solid and genuine.


What's needed is to start with the basis of what treaties are to Indigenous Peoples, Two Row Wampum and the Dish With One Spoon are a great start. It is a type of land acknowledgement between the Anishinaabe, Mississauga and Haudenosaunee that bound them to share the territory and protect the land. Subsequent Indigenous Nations and peoples, Europeans and all newcomers, have been invited into this treaty in the spirit of peace, friendship and respect.


We all eat out of the Dish – all of us that share this territory – with only one spoon. That means we have to share the responsibility of ensuring the dish is never empty; which includes, taking care of the land and the creatures we share it with. Importantly, there are no knives at the table, representing that we must keep the peace. The dish is graphically represented by the wampum.

The “Dish” represents what is now southern Ontario and from Lakes Ontario and Simcoe into the U.S.

Within the Two Row Wampum of 1613 between the Haudenosaunee and Dutch, the agreement was made that we would the Haudenosaunee and the Europeans must have a way to greet each other when they meet. The settlers with their large sailed boat thought that they should be called “Father” and the Haudenosaunee “Son.” The Haudenosaunee said that this would not do.

“We shall address each other as ‘Brothers.’ This shows that we are equal to each other.”

The Government must tell the truth about how deadly our situation is here on Turtle Island and around the world; it must reverse all policies not in alignment with that position and must work alongside the media and all BIPOC alternatives to communicate the urgency for change including what individuals, communities and businesses need to do. This is a demand from Extinction Rebellion Canada which now includes Indigenous voices in Canada to assist in the preservation of the next seven generations.


The intentions and goals of this Extinction Rebellion Canada are clear and provides a river for a vessel and canoe, for all to work together within their means and their own identities to unite for the bigger picture while holding and preserving the rich cultures and history that each peoples have as individuals, as Indigenous Nations, and as people in the global context. This is the concept of the ancestral teachings and the knowledge that has been preserved for millennia.

As Indigenous Peoples, we know it has always been time to act now. This especially on the heels of new scheduled work at Kanehsatake, where Oka is planning to decimate burial grounds. This is not only a huge disruption in lives during an already tumultuous time with the Corona-virus, it is the 30 year anniversary this summer since the Canadian Government sent in over 4,000 troops to invade the very same territory.


The creation of a Citizen's Assembly in charge of deciding the measures needed to reach goals and guarantee a just and fair transition will also allow for the proper Indigenous and Non Indigenous, Nation To Nation, diplomatic procedures and protocols to be taken into consideration and implemented and transform governance systems world-wide under the guidance of the natural order of things rather than colonial domination of genocide and religious doctrine.


This shows that we are in fact defending the land, laws that all of our ancestors have been bound to. We have been invaded and are not the instigators or bullies and we have an alliance that knows and understands this as well. "The voices of the unheard" as Dr. King put it are now coming together with shared history of torment and oppression.


We are a peaceful people who live to take care of Mother Earth in Peace. We have been giving our lives to defend the land not for ourselves but for the next seven generations. That means continuing our ways that were in place before contact, and they will be respected here more than anywhere else. This is why Canada needs to be dissolved and built for the settlers with Indigenous Peoples to look after the land and the resources that go with their governance system.

Extinction Rebellion is an international movement that uses non-violent civil disobedience in an attempt to halt mass extinction and minimise the risk of social collapse.

The time has come for Black and Indigenous People of Colour to work in depth with the Rebels in order to perfect and solidify the fourth demand, which currently reads:


"We demand a just transition that prioritises the most vulnerable people and indigenous sovereignty; establishes reparations and remediation led by and for Black people, Indigenous people, people of color and poor communities for years of environmental injustice, establishes legal rights for ecosystems to thrive and regenerate in perpetuity, and repairs the effects of ongoing ecocide to prevent extinction of human and all species, in order to maintain a liveable, just planet for all."


The fourth demand is something that will benefit the next seven generations and is dependent on our ancestral knowledge as BIPOC continuing on the road to restoring the future. Send your suggestions by email to decolonize@thecrediblemohawk.com with "Fourth Demand" in the subject line.


As previously mentioned, below are the 94 calls to action for the colonial government to fulfil and Extinction Rebellion will give us the platform to give the final push into the beginning of what is to come as a united front.


Nyawen

Sha'tekayenton Brant

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Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada:

Calls to Action


Legacy


Child welfare


1. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to commit to reducing the number of Aboriginal children in care by:


i. Monitoring and assessing neglect investigations.

ii. Providing adequate resources to enable Aboriginal communities and child-welfare organizations to keep Aboriginal families together where it is safe to do so, and to keep children in culturally appropriate environments, regardless of where they reside.

iii. Ensuring that social workers and others who conduct child-welfare investigations are properly educated and trained about the history and impacts of residential schools.

iv. Ensuring that social workers and others who conduct child-welfare investigations are properly educated and trained about the potential for Aboriginal communities and families to provide more appropriate solutions to family healing.

v. Requiring that all child-welfare decision makers consider the impact of the residential school experience on children and their caregivers.


2. We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with the provinces and territories, to prepare and publish annual reports on the number of Aboriginal children (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis) who are in care, compared with non-Aboriginal children, as well as the reasons for apprehension, the total spending on preventive and care services by child-welfare agencies, and the effectiveness of various interventions.


3. We call upon all levels of government to fully implement Jordan’s Principle.


4. We call upon the federal government to enact Aboriginal child-welfare legislation that establishes national standards for Aboriginal child apprehension and custody cases and includes principles that:

i. Affirm the right of Aboriginal governments to establish and maintain their own child-welfare agencies.

ii. Require all child-welfare agencies and courts to take the residential school legacy into account in their decision making.

iii. Establish, as an important priority, a requirement that placements of Aboriginal children into temporary and permanent care be culturally appropriate.


5. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to develop culturally appropriate parenting programs for Aboriginal families.


Education


6. We call upon the Government of Canada to repeal Section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada.


7. We call upon the federal government to develop with Aboriginal groups a joint strategy to eliminate educational and employment gaps between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians.


8. We call upon the federal government to eliminate the discrepancy in federal education funding for First Nations children being educated on reserves and those First Nations children being educated off reserves.


9. We call upon the federal government to prepare and publish annual reports comparing funding for the education of First Nations children on and off reserves, as well as educational and income attainments of Aboriginal peoples in Canada compared with non-Aboriginal people.


10. We call on the federal government to draft new Aboriginal education legislation with the full participation and informed consent of Aboriginal peoples. The new legislation would include a commitment to sufficient funding and would incorporate the following principles:


i. Providing sufficient funding to close identified educational achievement gaps within one generation.

ii. Improving education attainment levels and success rates.

iii. Developing culturally appropriate curricula.

iv. Protecting the right to Aboriginal languages, including the teaching of Aboriginal languages as credit courses.

v. Enabling parental and community responsibility, control, and accountability, similar to what parents enjoy in public school systems.

vi. Enabling parents to fully participate in the education of their children.

vii. Respecting and honouring Treaty relationships.


11. We call upon the federal government to provide adequate funding to end the backlog of First Nations students seeking a post-secondary education.


12. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to develop culturally appropriate early childhood education programs for Aboriginal families.


Language and culture


13. We call upon the federal government to acknowledge that Aboriginal rights include Aboriginal language rights.


14. We call upon the federal government to enact an Aboriginal Languages Act that incorporates the following principles:


i. Aboriginal languages are a fundamental and valued element of Canadian culture and society, and there is an urgency to preserve them.

ii. Aboriginal language rights are reinforced by the Treaties.

iii. The federal government has a responsibility to provide sufficient funds for Aboriginal-language revitalization and preservation.

iv. The preservation, revitalization, and strengthening of Aboriginal languages and cultures are best managed by Aboriginal people and communities.

v. Funding for Aboriginal language initiatives must reflect the diversity of Aboriginal languages.


15. We call upon the federal government to appoint, in consultation with Aboriginal groups, an Aboriginal Languages Commissioner. The commissioner should help promote Aboriginal languages and report on the adequacy of federal funding of Aboriginal-languages initiatives.


16. We call upon post-secondary institutions to create university and college degree and diploma programs in Aboriginal languages.


17. We call upon all levels of government to enable residential school Survivors and their families to reclaim names changed by the residential school system by waiving administrative costs for a period of five years for the name-change process and the revision of official identity documents, such as birth certificates, passports, driver’s licenses, health cards, status cards, and social insurance numbers.


Health


18. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to acknowledge that the current state of Aboriginal health in Canada is a direct result of previous Canadian government policies, including residential schools, and to recognize and implement the health-care rights of Aboriginal people as identified in international law, constitutional law, and under the Treaties.


19. We call upon the federal government, in consultation with Aboriginal peoples, to establish measurable goals to identify and close the gaps in health outcomes between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities, and to publish annual progress reports and assess longterm trends. Such efforts would focus on indicators such as: infant mortality, maternal health, suicide, mental health, addictions, life expectancy, birth rates, infant and child health issues, chronic diseases, illness and injury incidence, and the availability of appropriate health services.


20. In order to address the jurisdictional disputes concerning Aboriginal people who do not reside on reserves, we call upon the federal government to recognize, respect, and address the distinct health needs of the Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve Aboriginal peoples.


21. We call upon the federal government to provide sustainable funding for existing and new Aboriginal healing centres to address the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual harms caused by residential schools, and to ensure that the funding of healing centres in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories is a priority.


22. We call upon those who can effect change within the Canadian health-care system to recognize the value of Aboriginal healing practices and use them in the treatment of Aboriginal patients in collaboration with Aboriginal healers and Elders where requested by Aboriginal patients.


23. We call upon all levels of government to:


i. Increase the number of Aboriginal professionals working in the health-care field.

ii. Ensure the retention of Aboriginal health-care providers in Aboriginal communities.

iii. Provide cultural competency training for all healthcare professionals.


24. We call upon medical and nursing schools in Canada to require all students to take a course dealing with Aboriginal health issues, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, and Indigenous teachings and practices. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.


Justice


25. We call upon the federal government to establish a written policy that reaffirms the independence of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to investigate crimes in which the government has its own interest as a potential or real party in civil litigation.


26. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to review and amend their respective statutes of limitations to ensure that they conform to the principle that governments and other entities cannot rely on limitation defences to defend legal actions of historical abuse brought by Aboriginal people.


27. We call upon the Federation of Law Societies of Canada to ensure that lawyers receive appropriate cultural competency training, which includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal– Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.


28. We call upon law schools in Canada to require all law students to take a course in Aboriginal people and the law, which includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal–Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and antiracism.


29. We call upon the parties and, in particular, the federal government, to work collaboratively with plaintiffs not included in the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement to have disputed legal issues determined expeditiously on an agreed set of facts.


30. We call upon federal, provincial, and territorial governments to commit to eliminating the overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in custody over the next decade, and to issue detailed annual reports that monitor and evaluate progress in doing so.


31. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide sufficient and stable funding to implement and evaluate community sanctions that will provide realistic alternatives to imprisonment for Aboriginal offenders and respond to the underlying causes of offending.


32. We call upon the federal government to amend the Criminal Code to allow trial judges, upon giving reasons, to depart from mandatory minimum sentences and restrictions on the use of conditional sentences


33. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to recognize as a high priority the need to address and prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and to develop, in collaboration with Aboriginal people, FASD preventive programs that can be delivered in a culturally appropriate manner.


34. We call upon the governments of Canada, the provinces, and territories to undertake reforms to the criminal justice system to better address the needs of offenders with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), including:


i. Providing increased community resources and powers for courts to ensure that FASD is properly diagnosed, and that appropriate community supports are in place for those with FASD.

ii. Enacting statutory exemptions from mandatory minimum sentences of imprisonment for offenders affected by FASD.

iii. Providing community, correctional, and parole resources to maximize the ability of people with FASD to live in the community.

iv. Adopting appropriate evaluation mechanisms to measure the effectiveness of such programs and ensure community safety.


35. We call upon the federal government to eliminate barriers to the creation of additional Aboriginal healing lodges within the federal correctional system.


36. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to work with Aboriginal communities to provide culturally relevant services to inmates on issues such as substance abuse, family and domestic violence, and overcoming the experience of having been sexually abused.


37. We call upon the federal government to provide more supports for Aboriginal programming in halfway houses and parole services.


38. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to commit to eliminating the over representation of Aboriginal youth in custody over the next decade.


39. We call upon the federal government to develop a national plan to collect and publish data on the criminal victimization of Aboriginal people, including data related to homicide and family violence victimization.


40. We call on all levels of government, in collaboration with Aboriginal people, to create adequately funded and accessible Aboriginal-specific victim programs and services with appropriate evaluation mechanisms.


41. We call upon the federal government, in consultation with Aboriginal organizations, to appoint a public inquiry into the causes of, and remedies for, the disproportionate victimization of Aboriginal women and girls. The inquiry’s mandate would include:


i. Investigation into missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls.

ii. Links to the intergenerational legacy of residential schools.


42. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to commit to the recognition and implementation of Aboriginal justice systems in a manner consistent with the Treaty and Aboriginal rights of Aboriginal peoples, the Constitution Act, 1982, and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, endorsed by Canada in November 2012.


Reconciliation

Canadian Governments and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People


43. We call upon federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal governments to fully adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as the framework for reconciliation.


44. We call upon the Government of Canada to develop a national action plan, strategies, and other concrete measures to achieve the goals of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Royal Proclamation and Covenant of Reconciliation


45. We call upon the Government of Canada, on behalf of all Canadians, to jointly develop with Aboriginal peoples a Royal Proclamation of Reconciliation to be issued by the Crown. The proclamation would build on the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and the Treaty of Niagara of 1764, and reaffirm the nation-to-nation relationship between Aboriginal peoples and the Crown. The proclamation would include, but not be limited to, the following commitments:


i. Repudiate concepts used to justify European sovereignty over Indigenous lands and peoples such as the Doctrine of Discovery and terra nullius.

ii. Adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as the framework for reconciliation.

iii. Renew or establish Treaty relationships based on principles of mutual recognition, mutual respect, and shared responsibility for maintaining those relationships into the future.

iv. Reconcile Aboriginal and Crown constitutional and legal orders to ensure that Aboriginal peoples are full partners in Confederation, including the recognition and integration of Indigenous laws and legal traditions in negotiation and implementation processes involving Treaties, land claims, and other constructive agreements.


46. We call upon the parties to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement to develop and sign a Covenant of Reconciliation that would identify principles for working collaboratively to advance reconciliation in Canadian society, and that would include, but not be limited to:


i. Reaffirmation of the parties’ commitment to reconciliation.

ii. Repudiation of concepts used to justify European sovereignty over Indigenous lands and peoples, such as the Doctrine of Discovery and terra nullius, and the reformation of laws, governance structures, and policies within their respective institutions that continue to rely on such concepts.

iii. Full adoption and implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as the framework for reconciliation.

iv. Support for the renewal or establishment of Treaty relationships based on principles of mutual recognition, mutual respect, and shared responsibility for maintaining those relationships into the future.

v. Enabling those excluded from the Settlement Agreement to sign onto the Covenant of Reconciliation.

vi. Enabling additional parties to sign onto the